Daily Gains Letter

NYSE 2014–2016 Holiday Schedule

NYSE Holiday Schedule 2014, 2015 & 2016 | Stock Market Holidays Calendar 2014, 2015 & 2016

Regular hours for the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) are Monday through Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. EST. However, the stock market observes U.S. holidays, so below you will find the NYSE holidays for 2014 through 2016.

NYSE Holidays 2014 2015 2016
New Year’s Day January 1 January 1 January 1
Martin Luther King Jr. Day January 20 January 19 January 18
Washington’s Birthday February 17 February 16 February 15
Good Friday April 18 April 3 March 25
Memorial Day May 26 May 25 May 30
Independence Day July 4 July 3 July 4
Labor Day September 1 September 7 September 5
Thanksgiving Day November 27 November 26 November 24
Christmas Day December 25 December 25 December 26

Each market will close early at 1:00 p.m. EST on the following dates:

NYSE Partial Holidays
(1:00 p.m. EST Close)
2014 2015 2016
Day before Independence Day July 3 N/A July 3
Day following Thanksgiving November 28 November 27 November 25
Christmas Eve December 24 December 24 N/A

Crossing Session orders will be accepted beginning at 1:00 p.m. for continuous executions until 1:30 p.m. on these dates.

In Addition…

The exchanges will select a day of mourning (typically the day of the funeral) upon the death of a U.S. President. While not explicitly detailed in the stock market holiday schedule year after year, the exchanges will also observe moments of silence in commemoration of certain historic events (e.g. on September 11, 2006, it observed the five-year anniversary of 9/11 by closing from 9:29 a.m. to 9:30 a.m.). These observances will often not be accompanied by a halt of trading.

Not Quite NYSE Holidays, but…

Certain extraordinary events will cause the markets to close in addition to scheduled NYSE holidays. In the past, the nature of these events has varied from technical/system failures to natural disasters to war, etc.

Extraordinary market volatility has also had its effect on the NYSE schedule. On October 19, 1987, the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) dropped 508 points, a 22.6% loss in a single day. Officials invoked the “circuit breaker” rule (Rule 80B) to halt all trading. The decision was highly controversial, and the Rule was later revised with the intention of implementing a pause in trading to give investors time to reassess information and make informed choices during periods of high market volatility.

Under the revised Rule 80B, trigger points were set to signal halts in trading. These triggers were hit only once; this occurred on October 27, 1997, when the DJIA was down 350 points at 2:35 p.m. and 550 points at 3:30 p.m., shutting down the market for the remainder of the day.

Trigger levels are now set at losses of 10%, 20%, and 30%, calculated at the beginning of each calendar quarter, to set off halts for 30 minutes, one hour, two hours, or the rest of the trading day, depending on the level of loss and the time at which these trigger levels are hit in the trading day.

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